Is This Your Church?

“Very few pastors are actually called by God to work in large settings among wealthy people with huge, almost limitless resources. Most of us are asked to dig in with the poor and disheartened, with limited space, money and resources. That’s where Jesus and most of the early apostles spent the bulk of their time, so why should we expect different? According to the passage I just quoted, Paul had his share of both, and found that Christ gave him the strength to meet the challenges of each.”

Vaters, Karl (2013-01-02). The Grasshopper Myth: Big Churches, Small Churches and the Small Thinking that Divides Us (Kindle Locations 1614-1617). NewSmallChurch.com. Kindle Edition.

Just Stop. It’s Not Helping.

Excellent article yesterday from the New Small Church blog. Taking a look at the if-you-only-did-it-our-way types of articles and blog posts, Karl Vaters deflates the idea that the problem is always with the pettiness or poor attitude (faithlessness) of small church leadership. Now that we’ve seen the process of church cannibalism, and how the mega church is a type of  cruise ship.

The problem with many church leadership and church growth blogs is that they only offer up discouragement to the very leaders they purport to correct. After reading many  of these myself, the message is, “The problem is YOU. If you really cared, you’d do it right, or get out of the way.”

In the Restoration Movement, we seem to be much less Biblically (ironically) and theologically aware of our fascination with technique and pragmatism, Method is more than ever left unquestioned if it “works.” And what “works,” can often be reduced to people in the seats and funds flowing in, with less concern for what is happening spiritually to congregants. I can only hope the NACC is listening.